DOCTOR WHO 50 YEARS, 50 STORIES: 10-1

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10. THE CAVES OF ANDROZANI (1984) Doctor Who’s most beloved writer, Robert Holmes, was lured back to the series after a six year absence and gave us the best story of the 1980’s. Added to that, Graeme Harper’s direction raised it to the level of an action blockbuster (on a low budget!). The cliffhangers are fantastic too. Peter Davison couldn’t have asked for a better send off.  

9. THE WEB OF FEAR (1968) A wonderfully strange and eerie helping of 60s Who, as the army do battle with Yetis in the London Underground. The ultimate isolated base-under-attack story, with a striking sense of fear and claustrophobia in some impressively realised underground sets. An important story for Who, presenting the template of all earth-based UNIT stories which followed and the introduction of perhaps the series most loved character after The Doctor, Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart (here only a Colonel). And thanks to the recent discovery, this story is now an almost complete audio-visual experience! 

8. THE ROBOTS OF DEATH (1977) An excellent Agatha Christie-style whodunnit on a sandminer with murderous art deco service robots. This serial nods to the works of Isaac Asimov and continues the high quality in writing and production of Tom Baker’s first three seasons as The Doctor. And the robots designs are magnificent - sinister and beautiful at the same time. 

7. TERROR OF THE AUTONS (1971) After the more serious approach of the previous season, Series 8 opens with this mad and colourful story which returned the series to a more fantastical mode (something hinted by the comic strip Radio Times cover). Killer toy trolls, lethal plastic daffodils and suffocating chairs are some of the things the Third Doctor must contend with in his first onscreen encounter with The Master (the always wonderful Roger Delgado). And Autons dressed as policemen lead to questions of appropriateness being raised in parliament. 

6. THE SEEDS OF DOOM (1976) The first two episodes shamelessly rip off The Thing From Another World; the last four episodes take the series into new horrific areas of graphic body horror. As a whole, this is the most enjoyable Who 6 parter and the one I return to more than any other. Reuniting the dream team that gave us Terror of the Zygons (writer Robert Banks Stewart, director Douglas Camfield, music by Geoffrey Burgon) and of course Baker and Sladen at the height of their Doctor/Sarah-Jane relationship, it doesn’t get much better than The Seeds of Doom. Except for these five …

5. THE DAEMONS (1971) Probably the best encapsulation of the Pertwee years, with all the staples of that era present and correct: Jo, The Brigadier and UNIT, The Master, Bessie, a southern english countryside location and the Third Doctor desperatley trying to stick up for the human race against an alien menace - in this case a Devil-like ancient being and a living stone gargoyle. Inspired by Dennis Wheatley and the trend for folk horror in the early 70s, The Daemons best captures the kind of fantasy horror that could only have emerged from British film and TV in the 60s/70s. “Chap with the wings - five rounds rapid!” 

4. TERROR OF THE ZYGONS (1975) West Sussex doubles for the Scottish highlands in this gloriously timeless story, encompassing pretty much everything you could want from a sci-fi action serial. High on atmosphere, mystery and excitement, and featuring one of the series’ best realised monsters (the slimy Zygons and their organic spaceship) and one of the worst! (the ‘good when it’s stop-motion but bad when it’s a hand puppet’ Loch Ness dwelling Skarasen) Like a televisual Brigadoon, this is a magical concoction of location, fantasy and adventure, captured in time, but thankfully available to revisit at any time.

3. INFERNO (1970) A drilling project is mining deeper into the earth’s crust than ever before and The Doctor slips into a parallel universe to witness it’s terrifying outcome. The noise of the drill hangs over the story like an ominous harbinger of doom, and the tension is cranked up across seven episodes to maximum dramatic effect. The cliffhangers are amongst the scariest the series every achieved and director Douglas Camfield (responsible for four stories in this top 10) injects a gritty and stylish feel to all of it. The accumulation of Series 7, where the show experimented with it’s format more than it has before or since, Inferno works superbly as political allegory, thrilling action adventure and speculative science fiction. 

2. CITY OF DEATH (1979) The influence of Douglas Adams as writer and script editor on Doctor Who in the late 70s (the exact same time he was writing the first Hitch-Hiker’s Guide) is unmistakable: the series had some of it’s most ambitious sci-fi concepts but also it’s highest levels of comedy, notable in Tom Baker’s performance. And yet these years were amongst the most inconsistent in quality and yielded few classic stories - with the notable exception of this masterpiece, where all the elements of comedy-drama, fantasy, sci-fi and kitsch fell together perfectly (and almost by chance given that it was a hasty rewrite from Adams and producer Graham Williams under a pseudonym). With location filming in Paris, guest cameos from John Cleese and Eleanor Bron, Julian Glover as the suave villain, and a neat explanation for the creation of life on earth, this story feels like it’s something very special. And it is.  

1. PYRAMIDS OF MARS (1975) One of the first Doctor Who stories I watched, thanks to some early 90’s repeats, this one ensured that I would be devoted to the series from that point on. And whilst I’ve loved exploring the 200+ other stories, none of them have quite compared to the thrill of watching Pyramids Of Mars for the first time. Everything about the story is so perfectly judged. A small cast trapped behind a force shield in a 1911 country mansion, hunted down by killer robot Mummies. The threat of the world ending never felt so palpable in the series than here, thanks in large part to the sterling and committed performances of Tom Baker and Elizabeth Sladen, THE golden pairing of Doctor and companion. Writing, acting and production combining to the very best effect - television doesn’t get much better than this.

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DOCTOR WHO 50 YEARS, 50 STORIES: 20-11

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20, THE INVASION (1968) In what can now be seen as a dry run for the earth based action stories of the early 70s, the ever-evolving Cybermen march down the steps of St Paul’s and begin their invasion of London … Kevin Stoney is excellent as Tobias Vaughan, one of the great mad Who villains, and the gripping plot never sags over all it’s eight episodes.

19. WARRIORS’ GATE (1981) Set in a gateway between universes, Steven Gallagher’s script may just take the title as the most perplexing in the show’s history. And director Paul Joyce, influenced by Jean Cocteau, wanted to experiment visually within the tight limitations of the budget and was therefore never asked to direct for the show again. So what remains is a fascinating and beautiful aberration of a Doctor Who story.

18. HUMAN NATURE/THE FAMILY OF BLOOD (2007) The finest piece of new Who, Paul Cornell’s two-parter based on his Seventh Doctor novel opens with school teacher John Smith looking a lot like the Tenth Doctor in 1913, having used the chameleon arch to hide his Timelord DNA from the telepathic Family of Blood. Everything about this story is just so right, from the menacing Scarecrows, Martha’s devoted protection of The Doctor, Jessica Hynes’ caring Joan Redfern and David Tennant’s finest performance in the show as the confused and scared Mr Smith.

17. THE DEADLY ASSASSIN (1976) This surreal and unusual take on The Manchurian Candidate, shocked Who fans at the time for doing everything against convention: The Doctor, with no companions, is left alone to fight for survival in the nightmare world of the Matrix; the Timelords of Gallifrey are on full display for the first time and rather than God-like beings are shown to be a corrupt and stuffy civilisation; and The Master returned but instead of being a moustache-twirling villain he was now a mutilated walking corpse. One of those stories where you wonder how they ever got away with it.

16. THE CURSE OF FENRIC (1989) A superb revamp of the base-under-siege horror story, featuring aquatic vampires, submerged Viking gods, wartime codebreaking and Nicholas Parsons as a vicar! But best of all, the dark nature of McCoy’s Doctor and the consequences of his intergalatic chess battle with the ancient evil being Fenric.

15. THE ARK IN SPACE (1975) The last survivors of the human race are in cryonic suspension aboard a space station. But they’ve been asleep too long and something has joined them … An excellent start to the Hinchcliffe/Holmes era, with a tale of isolated horror and graphic alien possession (even if it is green bubble wrap). The first episode alone, showing The Doctor, Sarah and Harry exploring the apparently empty ark, is a masterclass in escalating mystery and good characterisation. 

14. REMEMBRANCE OF THE DALEKS (1988) The best surviving Dalek story (given that Masterplan, Power and Evil no longer exist) is a real return to form for late-80s Doctor Who and a perfect tribute to the show’s past in it’s 25th anniversary year. Sylvester McCoy was really finding his feet here, as a more cunning Seventh Doctor pits two warring Dalek factions against each other in Shoreditch 1963, setting of the show’s first TV story. And as all good fans know, the Daleks’ ascent of the staircase actually started here …

13. THE TOMB OF THE CYBERMEN (1967) Opening Troughton’s classic ‘Monster season’ of 1967-68, this much feted slice of 60s Who gave the Cybermen their finest hour and a half and presented the Second Doctor at his most mischievous. Genuinely frightening stuff for it’s time, with a level of violence that caused complaints and fuelled a media debate over the show for the first -but certainly not the last- time.

12. SPEARHEAD FROM SPACE (1970) The TARDIS crash lands on earth, in colour for the first time on TV, and with it the show underwent it’s biggest format changes since it began. Now entirely earthbound, focusing on the organisation U.N.I.T investigating strange phenomenon (25 years before The X Files) and with a new charismatic Doctor (comedian Jon Pertwee taking the role far more seriously than one might have imagined), the success of this story secured the show’s future. And the scenes of shop dummies smashing through windows is impressive in that no glass is seen to be broken!

11. THE TALONS OF WENG-CHIANG (1977) A fitting end to the Hinchcliffe years, as The Doctor and Leela land in Victorian London and encounter giant sewer rats and a killer ventriloquist dummy. Every staple of the era is referenced - Sherlock Holmes, Jack the Ripper, Phantom of the Opera, Fu Manchu - with a unique Doctor Who twist of a mastermind criminal from the 51st century.

DOCTOR WHO 50 YEARS, 50 STORIES: 30-21

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30. PLANET OF EVIL (1975)  With Tom Baker’s second season as Doctor, producer Phillip Hinchcliffe and script editor Robert Holmes fully embraced their mission to steer the programme towards gothic psychological horror, here influenced by Jekyll and Hyde. A nerve-tingling tale of possession which pre-empted Alien by four years.

29. EARTHSHOCK (1982)  The most popular of the 80s gung-ho adventure stories and the one most typical of script editor Eric Sward’s approach - to have plenty of action and plenty of Cybermen (or similar reoccuring villain). Not even a hilarioulsy miscast Beryl Reid as a gruff space freighter commander can ruin this one.

28. THE SEA DEVILS (1972) A colourful romp around Portsmouth harbour, as UNIT is replaced by the British Navy and the rubber suit budget reached new highs. And the interplay between Pertwee and Roger Delgado’s Master was never better. Feels like almost half an episode is taken up with them having a fencing duel!

27. GENESIS OF THE DALEKS (1975) One of the most revered Tom Baker stories (which is really saying something!) Terry Nation, worried that after 10 years each Dalek adventure was getting predictable, took the narrative back to their creation and introduced Davros, who was never more chilling than here, portrayed by Michael Wisher. The Nazi parallels were also never more apparent. 

26. DOCTOR WHO AND THE SILURIANS (1970) One of three 7-parters from Pertwee’s excellent first season, where the series took on a more serious, adult approach to moralistic issues (appropriate since the show’s fixed location was now literally down to earth). The closing episodes in which a deadly virus spreads across the country are some of the most harrowing scenes from this era of Doctor Who.  

25. THE DOCTOR’S WIFE (2011) Neil Gaiman’s much anticipated debut story for Who not only gave us a personification of the TARDIS for the first time (a wonderfully mad performance from Suranne Jones), but also presented a fantastically strange alien planet with patchwork inhabitants Uncle and Auntie, boasting some of the new series best production values. 

24. THE GREEN DEATH (1973) Or the one with the maggots. A perfect encapsulation of the Pertwee era: ecological issues at the forefront, UNIT battling a giant menace against dodgy CSO backdrops, plenty of Venusian aikido and The Doctor in drag!

23. KINDA (1982) Probably the most allegorical story ever transmitted under the Doctor Who banner, this highly experimental piece from writer Christopher Bailey deals with madness, colonialism, race memory and Buddhism. Some of it wouldn’t feel out of place within a David Lynch film. Testement to the great variety and adaptability of the show’s format.

22. THE BRAIN OF MORBIUS (1976) Full throttle gothic horror, with the series’ most explicit take on Frankenstein. Phillip Madoc chews up the scenery as Doctor Solon and Mary Whitehouse complained that the story “contained some of the sickest and most horrific material seen on children’s television”. And all the better for it.

21. BLINK (2007) The single best episode of nu-Who is almost completely Doctor-less (go figure) and relies instead on a great leading turn from Carey Mulligan as Sally Sparrow and Steven Moffat’s most effective time-mangling script for the show yet. And the Weeping Angels did for statues what Autons had done for shop window dummies. 

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DOCTOR WHO 50 YEARS, 50 STORIES: 40-31

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40.  DAY OF THE DALEKS (1972)  A great little time-looped tale of guerilla soldiers travelling back in time to prevent Word War III. The Daleks are so incidental to the story, they were clearly an after thought. But it’s good to see UNIT getting their chance to battle with them.

39.  THE GIRL WHO WAITED (2011) If only more of the new era’s stand-alone episodes managed to tell their stories this effectively in 45 minutes. Amy is separated from the TARDIS crew into an accelerated timestream and has to wait 36 years before they are reunited …  

38.  VENGEANCE ON VAROS (1985)  An Orwellian nightmare society of mutants, government controlled media broadcasting torture and Martin Jarvis as governor! The best (or perhaps worst) of Doctor Who’s violent 80s excesses. Watch in horror as The Doctor gleefully allows people to boil in acid! Video nasty Who?

37.  FURY FROM THE DEEP (1968) None of the six episodes exist, only fragments of film (actually the scariest bits, as they were the scenes cut by foreign censors before broadcast). But the audio is availble, and it’s a terrifiying listen. The epitome of the base-under-siege story that was a staple of the Troughton-era.

36.  THE EMPTY CHILD/THE DOCTOR DANCES (2005) An impressive depiction of London in the Blitz and some particularly creepy zombie-gasmask children. And Richard Wilson asking ‘are you my mummy?’  The first true indication that is was good to have the series back in the 21st century.

35.  LOGOPOLIS  (1981)  A good example of the kind of strange and complex Doctor Who produced in the early 80s under the helm of script editor Christopher H Bidmead. Entropy, recursion and block-transfer computations are just some of the plot elements. No wonder Tom Baker looks so sullenly bewildered as he heads towards his regeneration …

34.  ENLIGHTENMENT(1983) A wonderful central idea of god-like immortals taking sailing vessels from throughout history and racing them across the stars towards the prize of Enlightment. One of the best realised and most atmospheric stories of the Davison years.

33.  GHOST LIGHT (1989) The darker, more manipulative Seventh Doctor at his darkest and most manipulative. This beautifully realised Victorian ghost story takes several viewings to work at least some of it out but it hardly matters as it’s a joy to watch. A hint of the more challenging, adult-orientated direction the series was taking before it was axed.  

32.  VINCENT AND THE DOCTOR (2010) Given the chance to write for Doctor Who, you may have expected Richard Curtis to churn out a romantic historical comedy romp. Instead he gives us not only one of the most heart-wrenching epiosdes of Who, but also one of the best things he’s written in years.

31.  THE WAR GAMES (1969) And so 1960s black and white Doctor Who comes to an end with this epic story, introducing the Time Lords, and the very idea that The Doctor is a Time Lord, for the first time. Pivotal stuff, but what’s even more impressive is how the story holds up well across it’s entire 10 episodes.

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DOCTOR WHO 50 YEARS, 50 STORIES: 50-41

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50.  THE CELESTIAL TOYMAKER (1966) Hartnell vs Michael Gough and some creepy clowns in the first truly surreal Who story.

49.  SURVIVAL (1989) Freaky cat people and lesbian undertones. An ironic title given it was the last story of the original run. Even more ironic that it’s when the series was actually the best it had been for years.

48.  AMY’S CHOICE (2010) Simon Nye’s contribution to the series plays like one of the more bizarre Avengers episodes with a sprinkling of Midwich Cuckoos. Great guest spot from Toby Jones as the Dreamlord.

47.  CARNIVAL OF MONSTERS (1973) In which Pertwee’s Doctor gets trapped in an alien freakshow. Unconscious foretelling of reality television?

46.  THE CRIMSON HORROR (2013) One of the barmiest slices of modern Who, as Mark Gatiss pays tribute to all the weirdest British horror films of the 60s and 70s. Diana Rigg’s performance is totally loopy.

45.  IMAGE OF THE FENDAHL (1978) The last gasp of quaily gothic horror Who, featuring an ancient skull, a black magic cult and Wanda Ventham painted gold.

44.  THE TIME OF ANGELS/FLESH AND STONE (2010) The return of the Angels, when it was still a novelty. And the return of River Song, when that was still a novelty. A kind of 21st century Earthshock.

43.  THE MIND ROBBER (1969) The first episode is just The Doctor and his companions in a white void. Then the TARDIS explodes and it gets really odd …

42.  THE CLAWS OF AXOS (1971) Crazy psychedelic gold people crash their trippy mind-fuck ship into Earth, before turning themselves into giant blobs of spaghetti. Far out man!

41.  THE DALEK INVASION OF EARTH (1964) Inconic early Who. The Daleks trundled over Westminster Bridge and Dalekmania was born.

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13 WITCHCRAFT FILMS

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HAXAN: Witchcraft Through The Ages (1922, B Christensen)

BLACK SUNDAY (1960, Mario Bava)

NIGHT OF THE EAGLE (1962, Sidney Hayers)

THE WITCHES (1966, Cyril Frankel)

WITCHFINDER GENERAL (1968, Michael Reeves)

CRY OF THE BANSHEE (1970, Gordon Hessler)

MARK OF THE DEVIL (1970, Michael Armstrong, Adrian Hoven)

BARON BLOOD (1972, Mario Bava)

SEASON OF THE WITCH (1972, George A Romero)

SUSPIRIA (1977, Dario Argento)

INFERNO (1980, Dario Argento)

THE WITCHES (1990, Nicholas Roeg)

DRAG ME TO HELL (2009, Sam Raimi)

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13 COMEDY HORROR

CARRY ON SCREAMING! (1966, Gerald Thomas)

THE ABOMINABLE DR PHIBES (1971, Robert Fuest)

THEATRE OF BLOOD (1973, Douglas Hickox)

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN (1974, Mel Brooks)

GREMLINS (1984, Joe Dante)

EVIL DEAD II (1987, Sam Raimi)

I BOUGHT A VAMPIRE MOTORCYCLE (1990, Dirk Campbell)

ARMY OF DARKNESS (1992, Sam Raimi)

BRAINDEAD (1992, Peter Jackson)

SCARY MOVIE (2000, Keenen Ivory Wayans)

SHAUN OF THE DEAD (2004, Edgar Wright)

RUBBER (2010, Quentin Dupieux)

THE CABIN IN THE WOODS (2012, Drew Goddard)

13 PSYCHOLOGICAL HORROR FILMS

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DEAD OF NIGHT (1945, Cavalcanti, Crichton, Dearden, Hamer)

CARNIVAL OF SOULS (1962, Herk Harvey)

ONIBABA (1964, Kaneto Shindo)

REPULSION (1965, Roman Polanski)

LET’S SCARE JESSICA TO DEATH (1971, John D. Hancock)

THE OTHER (1972, Robert Mulligan)

DON’T LOOK NOW (1973, Nicholas Roeg)

THE ENTITY (1981, Sidney J. Furie)

THE VANISHING (1988, George Sluizer)

TWIN PEAKS: FIRE WALK WITH ME (1992, David Lynch)

FUNNY GAMES (1997, Michael Haneke)

THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (1999, D Myrick, E Sanchez)

BLACK SWAN (2010, Darren Aronofsky)

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21 FILMS IN THE SNOW

BAMBI  (James Algar, Samuel Armstrong, 1942)

THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD  (Christian Nyby, 1951)

THE SAVAGE INNOCENTS  (Nicholas Ray, 1960)

DR ZHIVAGO  (David Lean, 1965)

THE GREAT SILENCE  (1968, Sergio Corbucci)

ON HER MAJESTY’S SECRET SERVICE  (Pete Hunt, 1969)

McCABE AND MRS MILLER  (Robert Altman, 1971)

MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS  (Sidney Lumet, 1974)

THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK  (Irvin Kershner, 1980)

THE SHINING  (Stanley Kubrick, 1980)

THE THING  (John Carpenter, 1982)

PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES  (John Hughes, 1987)

HOME ALONE  (Chris Columbus, 1990)

MISERY  (Rob Reiner, 1990)

GROUNDHOG DAY  (Harold Ramis, 1993)

FARGO  (Joel Coen, 1996)

THE SWEET HEREAFTER  (Atom Egoyan, 1997)

A SIMPLE PLAN  (Sam Raimi, 1998)

TOUCHING THE VOID  (2003, Kevin MacDonald)

FROZEN RIVER  (Courtney Hunt, 2008)

LET THE RIGHT ONE IN  (Tomas Alfredson, 2008)

25 CHRISTMAS FILMS

  1. IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE (Capra, 1946)
  2. BRAZIL (Gilliam, 1985)
  3. THE APARTMENT (Wilder, 1960)
  4. THE MUPPET CHRISTMAS CAROL (Henson, 1992)
  5. GREMLINS (Dante, 1984)
  6. A CHRISTMAS STORY (Clark, 1983)
  7. HOME ALONE (Columbus, 1990)
  8. DIE HARD (McTiernan, 1988)
  9. SCROOGED (Donner, 1988)
  10. BAD SANTA (Zwigoff, 2003)
  11. TRADING PLACES (Landis, 1983)
  12. ELF (Favreau, 2003)
  13. SCROOGE (Hurst, 1951)
  14. BLACK CHRISTMAS (Clark, 1974)
  15. WHITE CHRISTMAS (Curtiz, 1954)
  16. THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS (Selick, 1993)
  17. MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET (Seaton, 1947 / Mayfield, 1994)
  18. THE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER (Lubitsch, 1940)
  19. HOME ALONE 2: LOST IN NEW YORK (Columbus, 1992)
  20. SCROOGE (Neame, 1970)
  21. TALES FROM THE CRYPT (Francis, 1972)
  22. NATIONAL LAMPOON’S CHRISTMAS VACATION (Chechik, 1989)
  23. THE SANTA CLAUS (Pasquin, 1994)
  24. MEET ME IN ST LOUIS (Minnelli, 1944)
  25. SANTA CLAUS: THE MOVIE (Szwarc, 1985)

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STANLEY KUBRICK TITLES 1955 - 1999

STANLEY KUBRICK TITLES 1955 - 1999

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13 CREATURE HORROR FILMS

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THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD  (1951, Christian Nyby)

INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS  (1956, Don Siegel)

THE BIRDS  (1963, Alfred Hitchcock)

JAWS  (1975, Steven Spielberg)

THE HILL’S HAVE EYES (1977, Wes Craven)

ALIEN  (1979, Ridley Scott)

POSSESSION  (1981, Andrzej Zulawski)

THE THING  (1982, John Carpenter)

ARACHNOPHOBIA  (1990, Frank Marshall)

TREMORS  (1990, Ron Underwood)

THE DESCENT  (2005, Neil Marshall)

PAN’S LABYRINTH  (2006, Guillermo Del Toro)

THE MIST  (2007, Frank Darabont)

13 SATANIC FILMS

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NIGHT OF THE DEMON  (1957, Jacques Tourneur)

THE MASQUE OF THE RED DEATH  (1964, Roger Corman)

THE DEVIL RIDES OUT  (1968, Terence Fisher)

ROSEMARY’S BABY  (1968, Roman Polanski)

BLOOD ON SATAN’S CLAW  (1971, Piers Haggard)

THE DEVILS  (1971, Ken Russell)

LISA AND THE DEVIL (1973, Mario Bava)

THE EXORCIST  (1973, William Friedkin)

THE WICKER MAN (1973, Robin Hardy)

THE OMEN  (1976, Richard Donner)

HELLRAISER  (1987, Clive Barker)

PRINCE OF DARKNESS (1987, John Carpenter)

THE LAST EXORCISM (2010, Daniel Stamm)

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13 PSYCHO KILLER FILMS

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M  (1931, Fritz Lang)

THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER (1955, Charles Laughton)

PSYCHO  (1960, Alfred Hitchcock)

A BAY OF BLOOD  (1971, Mario Bava)

THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE  (1974, Tobe Hooper)

DEEP RED  (1975, Dario Argento)

HALLOWEEN  (1978, John Carpenter)

DRESSED TO KILL  (1980, Brain De Palma)

A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (1984, Wes Craven)

HENRY: PORTRAIT OF A SERIAL KILLER (1986, J McNaughton)

CAPE FEAR  (1991, Martin Scorsese)

THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS  (1991, Jonathan Demme)

SCREAM  (1997, Wes Craven)

13 MAD SCIENTIST FILMS

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ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (1932, Erie C. Kenton)

THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1935, James Whale)

DR JEKYLL AND MR HYDE (1941, Victor Fleming)

THE CURSE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1957, Terence Fisher)

EYES WITHOUT A FACE (1960, Georges Franju)

I, MONSTER  (1971, Stephen Weeks)

HORROR HOSPITAL (1973, Antony Balch)

THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW  (1975, Jim Sharman)

RE-ANIMATOR (1985, Stuart Gordon)

THE FLY (1986, David Cronenberg)

EDWARD SCISSORHANDS (1990, Tim Burton)

MARY SHELLEY’S FRANKENSTEIN (1994, Kenneth Branagh)

SPIDER-MAN 2  (Sam Raimi, 2004)

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